1. You own a stock, and you’re concerned that the price of the stock may decline. What might you do to minimize risk of loss on the stock?

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1. You own a stock, and you’re concerned that the price of the stock may decline. What might you do to minimize risk of loss on the stock?

1. You own a stock, and you’re concerned that the price of the stock may decline. What might you do to minimize risk of loss on the stock?

A. Buy a put

B. Buy a call

C. Write a put

D. Buy a warrant

 

2. At a single time, a stock’s price is $10 and the premium for a call option on the stock is $3.

The strike price on the option is $8. How should you explain the additional value of the

premium over the difference between strike price and stock price?

A. The stock price and option price may have been quoted at different times when stock

values were different.

B. The market value of the option premium equals the difference between the strike price

and the market value of the stock.

C. The market value of the option premium equals the difference between the stock

market value and the strike price plus a time premium.

D. The hypothetical price of the option is less than the time premium.

 

3. Which of the following strategies offers the greatest potential to maximize rate of return on a stock if the stock price rises after you implement the strategy?

A. Purchase a stock and supplement your return by purchasing a call option on the stock.

B. Assume a naked position in the stock with a call option.

C. Write a covered put on the stock.

D. Write a naked put on the stock.

 

4. You speculate that the value of a stock won’t drop, and you’re unwilling to purchase the

stock or pay a premium for an option. What position would you take to profit by the stock’s

price not dropping?

A. Write a put.

B. Purchase a call

C. Write a call.

D. Employ a covered position.

 

5. What is your profit or loss under the following circumstances when the stock price rises?

You buy a stock at $15 and simultaneously buy a put. The strike price on the put is $12,

and you pay a $5 premium. The stock price rises to $16.

A. $5 loss

B. $4 loss

C. $2 profit

D. $3 profit

 

6. What is your loss in the following situation? You write a naked put when the stock price is

$50. The strike price is $55, and the stock price drops to $40. Assume the option is near

expiration and the market doesn’t assign any additional value to the option’s intrinsic value.

A. $10

B. $15

C. $20

D. $35

 

7. What is your profit or loss under the following circumstances? You buy a stock for $30, and

its price suddenly drops to $25. To avoid the risk of further losses, you buy a put with a

$30 strike price for $6. Subsequently, the stock price rises to $35, the option expires, and

you sell the stock.

A. $1 profit

B. $1 loss

C. $6 loss

D. $15 loss

8. What is your profit or loss under the following circumstances? You buy a stock for $25, and

simultaneously write a covered call with a $20 strike price and $7 premium. The stock

price rises to $28, and the buyer exercises the option and you sell your ownership in

the stock.

A. $3 loss

B. $2 loss

C. $2 profit

D. $3 profit

 

9. Which of the following positions would ordinarily minimize potential loss in terms of

percentage of investment? Assume the loss would be realized during the term of

the option.

A. Purchase a stock at $25.

B. Purchase a stock at $25 and a call on the stock for a $5 premium with a $21

strike price.

C. Purchase a call option for $4.

D. Purchase a stock at $25, and a put on the stock for a $5 premium with a $29

strike price.

 

10. The risk of shorting a stock is greater than the risk of buying a put because

A. the stock price can fall to zero, while the put limits risk to the amount of the premium.

B. a stock price change results in a relatively smaller change in an option on that stock.

C. the maximum risk of a put is the premium, while the maximum risk of shorting is

unlimited because price can rise without limit.

D. options provide unlimited hedging opportunities that render option positions less risky

than short stock positions.

 

11. Although arbitrage presents potential profit opportunities, the likelihood of individual

investors finding arbitrage opportunities is limited by

A. the tendency for stock values to fall away from the efficient frontier.

B. hedge strategies that combine option and stock purchases all but eliminate

arbitrage opportunities.

C. stock and option exchange managers, who are required to notify market makers when

arbitrage opportunities present themselves.

D. market makers, who are in a better position to detect and quickly capitalize before gaps

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1. You own a stock, and you’re concerned that the price of the stock may decline. What might you do to minimize risk of loss on the stock? was first posted on August 16, 2019 at 1:18 pm.
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